Fly tipping cost borough £18,412

Fly tipping
Fly tipping

Clearing up after fly tippers cost St Edmundsbury’s council tax payers £18,412 in 2016/17.

The borough had 334 fly tipping incidents reported and the majority of incidents involved household and garden items which can easily be disposed of legally.

The incidents included 51 involving black bags of household rubbish, 22 lots of dumped large household appliances and 156 ‘other household waste’.

Only 14 involved building debris, though there were five involving asbestos. Other commercial waste made up 25 incidents.

In terms of volume, the highest cost incurred was £7,360 for loads big enough to fill a Transit-sized van.

Fly tipping cost English councils £57,667,483 but St Edmundsbury fared better than some neighbouring councils with Breckland facing 1,060 incidents costing £60,631 to clear up.

However,South Cambridgeshire had only 211 incidents costing £8,760 to clear up and partner council Forest Heath had 264 incidents costing £11,898.

A West Suffolk councils spokesman said: “People who fly tip are lazy, ignorant and irresponsible. We have seen success through targeting hotspots, issuing fines of £200, and we have seen a decrease in fly tipping in Forest Heath as a result.

“Residents also need to be aware that there is a responsibility on them to ensure that they are using a registered waste carrier rather than paying someone who is perhaps cheaper to dispose of their rubbish. It’s cheap for a reason and that can lead to the homeowner being prosecuted.

“We encourage residents to use Household Waste Recycling Centres to dispose of bulkier items that can’t go in the fortnightly bin collections. Alternatively, the councils’ household bulky waste collection service will collect items for a small fee.”

See www.westsuffolk.gov.uk/bins/bulky-items.cfm

However, country business organisation CLA East’s regional director Ben Underwood said these figures do not include tipping on private land, where the land owner pays to clean-up.

He added: “Greater penalties should be imposed and enforced – including seizing fly-tippers’ vehicles – and victims should be better supported.”