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Community effort creates a new garden at a Haverhill pre-school

Staff and chidlren at Little Wonders Pre-School are very happy with their new garden ABCDE ANL-141205-143842009

Staff and chidlren at Little Wonders Pre-School are very happy with their new garden ABCDE ANL-141205-143842009

 

An area of unused and overgrown land next to a Haverhill pre-school has been transformed into a garden area thanks to a big community effort.

The graft put in by scores of volunteers means that children and staff at Little Wonders Pre-School, next to Westfield Primary Academy in Chalkstone Way, now have a dedicated outdoor area for planting, growing and learning about various aspects of gardening.

The project would not have been possible without the help of the children, parents, friends, the staff themselves and other volunteers who all turned out on two specially arranged gardening Sundays to plant, weed, make raised beds or even just make the tea.

Keelie Cordwell, who works at the pre-school expressed its gratitude for all the help that was given to the project.

She said: “We would like to thank all the children and there families for there time, effort and donations.

Colin Mowlem for making and putting up our fantastic new A Frame, Ian Donaghue for making some of our vegetable beds,

“Treadfirst for the tyres we used to create our hungry caterpillar. GMC for the loan of their van and donating the pallets we have used. Nick Ager for pallets and Brett Nicolas for his never ending tool kit and supplies.”

Having tied up the previously overgrown area strawberries, vegetables, and herbs such as sage and thyme have been planted, some are just seeds and some seedlings.

All the work has been done with the aim of educating the children about food in a way that is fun and collaborative.

Keelie added: “The whole living, growing and decaying process is all part of the Early Years Foundation Stage.

“It’s part of what we are expected to teach the children.”

Little Wonders is also putting in a sensory garden, which allows the children to learn through the use of their different senses, such as touch and smell and a forest garden.

“They are still expected, so there is still an opportunity for people to help if they can,” added Keelie.

 

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