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Could a PCSO be the answer to Haverhill town centre parking problems

Chief Constable of Suffolk, Douglas Paxton (left) and Suffolk Police and Crime Commissioner Tim Passmore at the public meeting in Haverhill ANL-140805-153655005

Chief Constable of Suffolk, Douglas Paxton (left) and Suffolk Police and Crime Commissioner Tim Passmore at the public meeting in Haverhill ANL-140805-153655005

 

A new solution to the continual parking abuses seen in Haverhill High Street could come in the form of a Police Community Support Officer (PCSO) specifically tasked to deal with the issue.

The suggestion was mooted by Haverhill Police Inspector Peter Ferrie during a public meeting involving Suffolk’s Chief Constable Douglas Paxton and Suffolk’s Police and Crime Commissioner, Tim Passmore at Samuel Ward Academy on Wednesday last week.

The issue of illegal parking in the High Street was raised by Chris Cullum, who said a deterrent was needed to stop people doing it and asked Chief Con Paxton and Mr Passmore if pressure could be put on Suffolk County Council (SCC) to get more done.

Insp Ferrie said his own preference was for a barrier to go up at the entrance to the High Street between 10am and 4pm, but SCC are not supportive of the idea.

With the proposed one way system for Camps Road also now looking unlikely to go ahead, Insp Ferrie added: “SCC are now prepared to part fund the PCSO to specifically work in the High Street to deal with that policing issue.

“If we got someone who is robust enough and prepared to put the effort in I’m confident that if someone is going to keep getting £30 tickets, unless they’ve got an endless supply of money there’s going to come a point when they say enough is enough.”

The funding would come in part from SCC, added Insp Ferrie, but his superior officer in the force would need to decide if it was a ‘suitable thing to do.’

SCC is now working with Haverhill’s three county councillors to try and come up with a solution to the proposal.

Chief Con Paxton added that Haverhill’s parking problems may need a different approach, saying that ‘road engineering solutions’ may be more appropriate than police enforcement.

 

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