Tourism revival is helped by Brexit blues

Clay Hall House, luxury Bed and Breakfast business which has seen a boom in trade due to falling pound etc.

Pictured: Simon Oldfield and Angela Groves (along with Grace the dog) ANL-161025-133841009

Clay Hall House, luxury Bed and Breakfast business which has seen a boom in trade due to falling pound etc. Pictured: Simon Oldfield and Angela Groves (along with Grace the dog) ANL-161025-133841009

0
Have your say

Acton bed and breakfast owner Simon Oldfield was braced for a big downturn in business after Brexit - but instead his business is booming.

He owns Clay Hall House, a 500-year-old Tudor manor house, bought from the late Spurs and England footballer Jimmy Greaves two years ago.

More visitors are discovering what he calls the ‘golden triangle’ of Lavenham, Sudbury and Long Melford. His guests have pushed Clay Hall House to number two on Trip Advisor rankings of Sudbury inns and B&Bs, he says

“Predictions of economic gloom before and after the referendum just haven’t proved true - quite the opposite. In the six months since the end of April our turnover has been higher than the whole of the previous year, and we’re already taking bookings well into next year,” he said.

He believes several factors are driving the tourism market. “The weak pound is definitely encouraging far more foreign visitors. We’ve had guests from all over Europe, America, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and even Japan and Korea. They all say they’re delighted at what they get for their own currencies - and they spend their pounds here in Suffolk.

“By the same token, more British people are opting for a ‘staycation’ by holidaying here in the UK to avoid punishingly low exchange rates at foreign destinations,” he added.