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Good Friday concert at St Mary's Church in Haverhill will raise awareness of the situation faced by 11-year-old Cayden Tickner, who has a brain tumour




The grandad of an 11-year-old Haverhill boy with a brain tumour that has started to grow again is dedicating a special musical performance to his grandson.

Richard Hart, the Director of Music at St Mary's Church in Haverhill, is dedicating the performance at 6pm on Good Friday of The Passion of Christ, by Arthur Somerville, to his grandson Cayden Tickner.

Admission is free with a retiring collection.

Richard Hart, the grandad of Cayden Tickner and musical director at St Mary's Church, Haverhill and inset, Cayden
Richard Hart, the grandad of Cayden Tickner and musical director at St Mary's Church, Haverhill and inset, Cayden

Richard said: "Although this performance is not a fund-raiser it is being dedicated to highlight the awareness of the difficult time that Cayden and his family are going through.

"The family are waiting to hear from Addenbrookes Hospital to see if Cayden can be offered a new cancer drug which is having an element of success with adults (but has not yet been tried on children).

"The hospital is seeking permission to offer this new drug to Cayden hoping he will benefit."

As featured by the Echo in May 2018 (HERE) Cayden was found to have a large tumour growing on his brain in March of that year.

It had caused him to lose his sight in one eye and to have only partial sight in the other.

Cayden has since lost all vision completely.

All but 6 per cent of the tumour, which is highly aggressive, was surgically removed and Cayden has since had to endure intensive radiotherapy and chemotherapy in a bid to defeat the growth.

Cayden Tickner pictured at the Holiday Club run by St Mary's Church in Haverhill last summer. Picture by Mecha Morton.
Cayden Tickner pictured at the Holiday Club run by St Mary's Church in Haverhill last summer. Picture by Mecha Morton.

The treatment has not reaped the hoped-for results, leaving Cayden, a former pupil of New Cangle Primary School, and his family, including parents Gavin and Carol, with one last hope - getting access to the new drug.

Richard added: "We are just keeping our fingers crossed that they can offer it to him.

"You feel as if you would do anything or pay anything to get some treatment if its out there.

"We just don't know what the outcome for him is going to be."

Last October a special Come and Sing of 'Joseph and his Amazing Technicolour Dream Coat' was performed at St Mary's and raised over £1,400 for Cayden's Journey, the charity formed to help pay for Cayden's care and treatment.

Last July, one of Cayden's other grandads, Steve Morris, of Haverhill, and his uncle Lee Taylor, of Steeple Bumpstead, cycled a total of 2343 miles from Haverhill to the north Norfolk coast and back, raising £3,000 for Cayden's Journey.



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