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Linton micro-brewery marks its first birthday with a party




A micro-brewery and tap room in Linton had a party on Saturday as its owners celebrated completing their first year in business.

Wylde Sky Brewing had live music from The Rusty Rockets and The Accelerants and food from Steak & Honour, The Cook’s Nest and Waffle & Co, plus of course plenty of beer brewed in-house at its site in The Grip, Hadstock Road.

Paul Elilio founded the brewery last year with two partners who have both since left, with Chris Heath coming in to the fold.

Wylde Sky Brewing directors Paul Elilio, right, and Chris Heath toast their business's first anniversary. Picture by Mecha Morton
Wylde Sky Brewing directors Paul Elilio, right, and Chris Heath toast their business's first anniversary. Picture by Mecha Morton

“It is going well, considering we have just about passed that first year milestone,” said Paul. “Statistically I think it’s three in five businesses fail in the first year, so in that respect we are doing well.

“We are very lucky that people in Linton have been incredibly supportive. I think for them it’s just a different environment. A lot of people here have never been into a tap room and don’t know what to expect.”

The most popular beer at Wylde Sky Brewing is probably the American pale said Paul, who began his own brewing journey in 1983 when he brought his first home brew kit from Boots.

Paul emphasised that he remains a smaller-scale brewer but he is in talks with another brewer with a commercial background to come on board.

Many other styles of beer are brewed on site , including a coffee stout, Scottish 60 shilling, English rye ale, saison and continental IPA.

Most of the beer is sold from kegs and cans in the tap room, which, added Paul, has six taps, five of them serving beer brewed on site and the other containing a guest beer or cider.

Brews are also sold at beer festivals - this year it got to showcase some of its ales at the Cambridge Beer Festival for the first time- and at some local pubs, including The Three Hills at Bartlow and the Pint Shop and Cambridge Blue in Cambridge.

Paul added: “We do try and sell to trade where we can but it’s very hard because we don’t always have the time to dedicate to pursuing the trade sales and secondly it’s very hard to break into that market. Some pubs are tied or have an approved list of brewers that they will deal with.”

Once the new brewer gets involved, said Paul, more time can be given to increasing trade sales.



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