Norfolk and Suffolk top the UK’s treasure charts

These gold treasures found in Suffolk and declared under the Treasure Act now belong to Moyse's Hall Museum in Bury Sy Edmunds
These gold treasures found in Suffolk and declared under the Treasure Act now belong to Moyse's Hall Museum in Bury Sy Edmunds

Norfolk and Suffolk have topped the treasure charts for the second year running.

According to figures released today by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, more treasure have been found in the two counties than any others.

There were 130 finds in Norfolk and 81 in Suffolk in 2016, representing 13 and nine per cent of all UK finds respectively. That is up from Norfolk’s 12 per cent and Suffolk’s seven per cent of all finds in 2015.

Across the country there were 1,120 finds in 2016, up from 1,005 in 2015.

The increase is partly down to the popularity of metal detecting with 96.2 per cent of treasures found that way. Your chances of finding an item by luck are slim, with less than one per cent found that way.

The 1996 Treasure Act, says finders must declare items containing precious metals.