Home   News   Article

Cardiac arrest survivor Richard Coxall tells Haverhill Town Council it is vital to increase, not decrease, the town's ambulance cover




A plea for ambulance cover to be ‘increased and not taken away’ was conveyed to a packed meeting of Haverhill Town Council last week by a cardiac arrest survivor.

Cllr Joe Mason read out a letter by Richard Coxall, a caretaker at Castle Manor Academy, in Haverhill, who suffered a cardiac arrest in September 2013 and, was only saved – despite being ‘clinically dead for 14 minutes’ – because a paramedic was sat in a Rapid Response Vehicle (RRV) in the town and got to him within five minutes of getting the call.

In his letter, Mr Coxall said: “I would not be here today without the quick response of the ambulance service.

“If I had to wait for an ambulance to come from Cambridge or Bury, it is highly unlikely I would be here today.

“With the rapidly expanding population of Haverhill, ambulance cover should be increased, not taken away.”

Paramedics returned to meet cardiac arrest survivor Richard Coxall in 2014, one year on from his brush with death. Pictured: Lisa Murkin (Paramedic), Frances Sewell (Emergency Medical Technician), Helen Wrigley (Occupational Therapist), Richard Coxall and Louise O'Connor (Paramedic).
Paramedics returned to meet cardiac arrest survivor Richard Coxall in 2014, one year on from his brush with death. Pictured: Lisa Murkin (Paramedic), Frances Sewell (Emergency Medical Technician), Helen Wrigley (Occupational Therapist), Richard Coxall and Louise O'Connor (Paramedic).

Last week, the Echo revealed how the town council is unhappy at the East of England Ambulance Service Trust’s (EEAST) plans to cut the number of ambulances based overnight at its Camps Road station from two to one, as of next February.

The town council also believes the trust is considering closing the station – although this has not been confirmed despite the council pressing the trust for months for more information – and it is also unhappy that the RRV is no longer based in Haverhill when not in use, but taken away to be used in other areas, mostly Cambridge.

The town council has formed a working group, involving councillors and members of the public, to take their concerns forward, although how it does that, said town clerk Colin Poole, is uncertain given the lack of communication from EEAST .



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More