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Haverhill soldier who died in First World War has a street named after him in Chelmsford




A street in Springfield, Chelmsford, has been named after a soldier from Haverhill who was killed in action in the First World War and whose name is listed on the Haverhill war memorial.

The street was given the name of Jackson Bacon View thanks to the intervention of the soldier’s great nephew, Andy Thomas, a resident of Chelmsford who also served as a soldier in the British Army from 1993 to 1999.

Jackson was a private in the 11th Battalion of the Essex Regiment who was born and bred in Haverhill and was killed in action at Loos in France on June 28, 1917 at the age of 23.

Jackson Bacon
Jackson Bacon

He died while assisting a badly injured officer across no man’s land.

Andy, who served in the Royal Anglian Regiment, which was formed from the merger of the Essex Regiment and seven other county regiments, said: “Chelmsford Borough Council were looking for names, I think it was 20 local soldiers and sailors who served in the First World War, to commemorate the new development and I put Jackson Bacon’s name forward and luckily he got selected.

“The thing about Jackson is that he was a Haverhill lad born and bred. I think his dad worked for the Gurteen family in the late 1880s.

The Jackson Bacon Close street sign in Springfield, Chelmsford. Picture by Andy Thomas (11667367)
The Jackson Bacon Close street sign in Springfield, Chelmsford. Picture by Andy Thomas (11667367)

“My mum (whose grandad, Stephen Bacon, was Jackson’s brother) saw his name in the history museum in Haverhill about four or five years ago and said that’s my great uncle and she told me about it and I thought that’s a nice bit of history, and we’ve had a few conversations about it since.

“Then I went over to Haverhill and saw his name in the cemetery, on the memorial, and I thought it would be good to have his name on the road sign. I thought that would be good, it would be a fitting tribute to him.

“I’m chuffed they did select his name.”

Jackson had already left Haverhill by the time the war broke out and was living in Chelmsford.

He was serving in the 11th Battalion, Essex Regiment when he married Rose Jane Bowers in Chemsford Cathedral on March 10, 1917, just three months before he was killed. On the day he died, his battalion had carried out a trench raid. Although it was deemed to be a success, it resulted in almost 50 per cent of the attacking force being wounded or killed.

Andy Tomas, second left, with some family members at the Essex Regiment memorial in Chelmsford. Contributed picture (11667100)
Andy Tomas, second left, with some family members at the Essex Regiment memorial in Chelmsford. Contributed picture (11667100)

Jackson is remembered on the Loos Memorial in the Pas de Calais, and is on the Haverhill Roll of Honour (1914-1919), as well as on a memorial plaque at the Old Independent Church in Haverhill.



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